Just what is YA?

Children’s Book Week – June 12-16

When books were just books

When I was growing up, there was no such thing as “young adult” as a marketing niche.

In my house, there were just books. Never was I told that any of those books were not for me. I was reading fully “grown-up” literature when I was 7. I read my mother’s Pearl Buck collection before I was 10 and I didn’t have any difficulty with any of it.

Children who are encouraged to read and permitted to read will find their own level. They might well enjoy today’s “age-appropriate” middle grade or YA offerings, But then, if the books are good enough, so will many people who have long since left their teens behind. A good story can be read by anybody who loves to read, from age 12 to 92, without any artificial age boundaries in there.

And I’m using 12 as a beginning with a distinct sense that it is fungible. There are precocious readers who can read this stuff much younger, as I did, The relationship between a book and its reader is always very individual and specific and quite often unpredictable.

Age distinctions are a recent development, and since their arrival we have had kidlit fragment into picture books for VERY young readers, chapter books, middle grade, YA, New Adult.

People are constantly asking where are the lines? And that is a good question because it simply isn’t true that a young protagonist is all that it takes for a book to be YA. You could look at “Lolita” through that lens and because it has a young girl center stage – she’s even the title – you might throw a wholly undeserved YA label on it.

For a long time Harry Potter was pretty much THE YA genre. Everyone knew about Harry. And a generation grew up having picked up the first book when they were Harry’s age and then aged concurrently with it, adding their years just as Harry did his.

But the Harry Potter books and movies are very much a ladder and the first one feels almost simplistic. The subsequent books are much darker, much more complicated while still rated YA. Young readers are expected to cope with a very broad range of material, and this is often underestimated when it comes to “children’s literature”. Children can understand so very much – especially if you root it in familiar tropes.

My first YA series

Worldweavers coversThe first series I wrote for a YA audience was Worldweavers (“Gift of the Unmage”, “Spellspam”, “Cybermage”, “Dawn of Magic”) It was born out of a YA panel at the 2002 Fantasy Worldcon, where Jane Yolen, the grande dame of children’s lit, said at one point that she didn’t like the way the Potter books treated their girls. I lost the rest of the panel completely because that was all it took for Thea Winthrop to step out of the shadows and introduce herself to me.

Her story had all the tropes. Thea went to a school known as the Last Ditch School for the Incurably Incompetent, a place for the weird and geekish in her magical world. Thea was a Double Seventh, the seventh child of two seventh children, and her magical gifts were expected to be profound. Instead, she grew up as the Girl Who Couldn’t Do Magic.

It wasn’t that she was bad at magic in her magical world – she could not do it at all. To her, it was like she was standing behind a glass wall, unable to reach or touch or practice it. The reason behind that initial paralysis drove the whole series.

I peopled my book with three different kinds of creatures.

There are humans, much like us who can’t do magic. And there are those who can. And some of the magic users were rather famous in our own world, like Nikola Tesla, known widely as the Wizard of the West during his life and, when he appears in my books, the only quad-Elemental mage in human history.

The second group group of creatures are those I wholly invented, like my Alphiri. They look like Tolkien’s elves but have the grasping souls of Star Trek’s Ferengi and a built-in conviction that everything is for sale.

The third group of creatures are drawn from the American mythos – creatures like Grandmother Spider, and Tawaha the Sun God, and Coyote the Trickster.

I wove a story around them all – a story which revolved around one thing: about Thea’s coming of age, and into her own.

In fact, she becomes powerful indeed – becomes something quite unique (no spoilers; you’ll have to read the books to find out what.) But this doesn’t happen overnight, or easily. There are things she has to be willing to sacrifice on her road to the apex of her existence. She has to be willing to offer things she cherishes deeply, in order to save a friend. And then in order to save her world, she has to make tough choices that will haunt her for the rest of her life. By the end of these books, my little girl is a little girl no longer. She is a grown, fully developed human being.

That is not to say she has become perfect – but that is not the point of a YA book. It is not to tell a young reader that one has to be flawless in order to survive. It is to assure them that flaws are inevitable, even necessary, but that it is possible to transcend them, or incorporate them into one’s being, and grow through that process.

Thea Winthrop is an amazing character who was a gift to work with. She is fourteen when we first meet her, and she is the perfect insecure teenager, one who disappoints her parents and knows it and is made miserable by it. She doesn’t quite know how to make it right. This is familiar territory to many young readers, who don’t live in a world of magic but who have, in their time, known that look of disappointment on their elders’ faces and have quailed at it. They will be standing right there next to Thea when she has her experiences. They understand – and they will be waiting for her to deal with that burden, to see how she does it, to see if they can learn something about how to deal with their own.

I wrote a book and series about choices and about growing up DIFFERENT and how to handle it all, even when you have to do it with fear, or with reluctance, or with only just enough grace to scrape by. And also with joy – the joy of discovery of one’s real identity, one’s real potential. The joy of friendship. The joy of learning, and of growing wise. And also the bitterness of betrayal, and the agony of failure, and what sometimes feels the almost unbearable burden of survival against the odds. It’s about proving something, both to oneself and to others.

In some ways, that journey is the best of “children’s literature” – the coming of age stories – and there are many out there, from Susan Cooper, to Madeleine L’Engle, to C S Lewis, to J K Rowling and the Potterverse. And I’m not talking about just fantasy. There are plenty of authors over there in the REAL “real” world who tell stories that could well have happened in our own real lives. But is something like “Stand by Me” or “The Outsiders” truly limited to a YA audience? Can the people who might already have passed the finish line of the “coming of age” race and are acknowledged as fully adult not be allowed to look back and remember the road they travelled to get there, in the worlds of “children’s literature”?

It’s all about the story

The best of children’s literature is basically a good story which can be enjoyed by a reader of any age. In the end, what it boils down to is whether your young reader can stand beside a character in a story, stand beside them and support them, at the same time stand beside them and learn from them what is possible, what is permitted and what is unthinkable – and why.

“Children’s literature” is formative, introducing the young to the realms of Story where they will either flourish and thrive or where they will founder – and foundering is easy enough, if the readers in question are bullied or forced into books. A fostered love of reading is essential when it comes to staying in love with the written word.

In my books, that translates into a certain complexity of story. Thea’s tale is layered and complicated, just like any “real” growing up would have been. I paint relationships there – very different ones – relationships where she is very much the acolyte, relationships where she is the adversary, and relationships where she is loved and cherished.

They are all necessary for the story to get woven together. They form as complex a backdrop as any “real” life might, and the reason they are necessary and the reason they work are the same – they sparkle with recognition, with tiny glittering pieces which a reader might pause and take a closer look at and find something very familiar in them, perhaps a reflection of themselves.

When we are adults, we assume that we understand the world we live in and are able to deal with what it throws at us because we are familiar with the context of it all. In “Children’s literature” the protagonist is just starting to come to terms with a world – that is often baffling and sometimes frightening.

That is what makes the Worldweavers books the “youngest” books I have ever written, not because of a simplistic measure like the age of their protagonist but because this isn’t about a journey finished and now remembered, being, instead, about the journey AS IT HAPPENS, counting the steps it takes to cross a room, a river, or a world. The young readers of such books are sharing that journey themselves, in real time, and that is why a good “kid” book is going to appeal to them – they will recognize themselves in the protagonist and that protagonist’s position in the story they’re reading.

In the space of a few short days devoted to a Children’s Literature Week, it is impossible to cover all the books that matter in this context – but what is important is simply this: that there are certain books which are The Beginning, the origin station for a lifelong journey into the world of the word. And that is to be celebrated.

My second YA series is The Were Chronicles – but that’s for another time.

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Quote of the Day

“The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you have been.” ~ Novelist Madeleine L’Engle

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Encounters with The Trickster

Let me tell you about my encounter with Coyote…

So begins my guest blog today at the Mythical Monday spot at Melissa Hayden’s website My World…in words and pages:

The Tricksterthe-kunadalin .com

When I set out to write the Worldweavers books, I wanted to write a story which was an American YA fantasy, something of an across-the-pond answer to the Harry Potter phenomenon which ruled the YA universe with an iron fist at that time. I wanted to get away from the usual Eurocentric fantasy and mythology, I wanted to ground the stories that I would write firmly in the New World… and the way that opened up for me to do this was by exploring themes in the Native American mythos. Avatars of the gods and spirits from that mythological sphere became characters in my stories.

Grandmother Spider became something of a mentor for my young protagonist – and since every light has to have a shadow associated with it, the Trickster God, Coyote, ambled onto the stage with a hat-tilt and a wicked grin ….

Worldweavers1Cover of the Sky Warrior Books edition

 Read the whole post at Melissa’s blog

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I have never used a real writer in my fiction, however I have used a real person. Nikola Tesla was a remarkable inventor, one of the technological founders of our modern world. He is a major figure in my Worldweavers young adult series.

The best fiction featuring real writers

From Colm Tóibín to Italo Calvino, novelist Rachel Cantor describes in the Guardian her favorite encounters with real authors who appear in other people’s books. For example:

Walt Whitman in Gob’s Grief by Chris Adrian

Gob survives the Civil War, unlike his brother Tomo, who ran off to join the army at the age of 11 and died during his first battle. Walt Whitman, meanwhile, dreams his brother has been lost in the war, only to find him at a hospital just slightly wounded. When brother George is moved elsewhere, Walt lingers, making himself useful to doctors and nurses, first at this hospital, and then another, and another. He chats with wounded soldiers, reads to them, distributes oranges, writes letters, or just sits, watching “with excited worry”. It is Whitman Gob turns to when he needs a man full of emotion to power a machine he has built to bring the Civil War dead back to life.

Jeremy Irons as Franz KafkaArtist impression … Jeremy Irons as Franz Kafka in Steven Soderbergh’s 1991 film Kafka. Photograph: Moviestore Collection/Rex

 Real writers in fiction

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8 Female Characters In Literature Who Deserve Their Own Damn Books

Books give readers the unparalleled opportunity to assume the perspective of someone other than themselves, Amanda Scherker says at Hufff Post Books.

But in assuming the perspective of one character, the reader is often denied the chance to explore the internal joys and woes of other characters in the story. We’d argue that literature is bursting with female characters who deserve stories of their own.

 Here are eight female characters who definitely deserve their own books.

The Son Also Rises

Brett from Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises

 As one of Hemingway’s most memorable characters, the glamorous Lady Brett Ashley wields power over the adoring men who perpetually surround her. While her seductive and chaotic energy catalyzes much of the novel’s action, her internal world remains enigmatic to the reader. At one point, the narrator notes that Brett “can’t go anywhere alone.” Still, her wistful gaiety makes us wonder who Brett really is when she’s left in the solitude of her hotel room. Perhaps our best clue into her life and regrets rests in her memorable line, in which she says, “Oh, Jake… we could have had such a damned good time together.”

 They deserve their own books

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The giraffe manor in Nairobi

Giraffe Manor is a unique property and hotel in the Lang’ata suburb of Nairobi, Kenya, famous for its resident herd of endangered Rothschild giraffes that live in the extensive grounds of the manor house. Every day shortly before 9am, the mammoth beasts stroll up to the house and poke their heads through the windows and doors in search of morning treats. This is the only place in the world where one can share breakfast with the world’s tallest animal.

Breakfast with giraffes

Sharing breakfast

Breakfast with the giraffes

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Quote of the Day

 “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.” ~ Mark Twain

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Alma Alexander

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 Comments welcome. What do you think?

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‘I know how you’re feeling…

…I read Chekhov.’

Reading Chekhov for a few minutes makes you better at decoding what other people are feeling. But scientists say that spending the same amount of time with a potboiler by Danielle Steel does not have the same effect, Pam Belluck reported in the New York Times.  

Literary fiction often leaves more to the imagination, the authors of the study say, encouraging readers to make inferences about characters and be sensitive to emotional nuance and complexity.

Reading classics

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From a review of my Midnight at Spanish Gardens at Meeka’s Mind

How do I describe that? Contemporary metaphysical fantasy literature?

Yet even that convoluted category doesn’t accurately describe Midnight at Spanish Gardens, because how the main characters come to relive their lives is less important than what they do with those second chances.

I am of course delighted by that, and especially this!

If (it) contained even a smidgeon of science fiction I’d give it 11/10. As it is I can only give it a 10.

Spanish Gardens review

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A New Theory on Mark Twain

IN THE 150 YEARS Samuel Clemens has been better known as Mark Twain, journalists, scholars, and even bartenders have offered competing theories as to where America’s first signature wit acquired his nom de plume, Daniel Hernandez writes.

According to Twain, his pen name once belonged to a Mississippi riverboat captain, and he merely ‘laid violent hands upon it.’ Newspapers at the time however claimed he earned his alias drinking at a one-bit saloon in Virginia City, Nevada.

A rare book dealer suggests that Clemens found his pseudonym in a popular humor journal, then invented the riverboat story to promote his Missouri roots.  That offers some insight into Twain’s personal character: his proven cunning in respect to his brand.

The Mark Twain brand

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British words that mean something quite different in the USA

Americans speak the same language as our ye old predecessors in Great Britain, but we don’t always speak it the same way, Bigstock Blog says.

So, we asked our oh-so British receptionist, Ryan Lovett, to give us a crash course in some of the more notable discrepancies.
A bisquit by any other nameBritish vs American English

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A Cave With Clouds

These remarkable pictures are the first-ever images taken of Er Wang Dong, one of the world’s most recently discovered natural wonders — a cave so large it has its own weather system.

Er Wang Dong cave

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What Tesla said:

My method is different. I do not rush into actual work. When I get a new idea, I start at once building it up in my imagination, and make improvements and operate the device in my mind. When I have gone so far as to embody everything in my invention, every possible improvement I can think of, and when I see no fault anywhere, I put into concrete form the final product of my brain.

I don’t invent things, but that’s pretty much how I invent worlds, Mr. Tesla.

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Alma Alexander

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