Dangerous Women

After the exhilaration brought on by the massive Women’s March, I found it both amusing and infuriating to browse through these

Postcards warning men about the dangers of women’s rights

They were put together by Tara McGinley who wrote: “Here’s a collection of totally ridiculous vintage postcards and posters dated from around 1900 to 1914 warning men of the dangers associated with the suffragette movement and of allowing women to think for themselves.”

postcards posterExcept for the clothes, I am not entirely sure that things have changed all that much.

See more postcards at Dangerous Minds website HERE

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HORIZONS MURALFeature image: detail from “Horizons” a mural by Robert McCall.

I always remain astonished at the disdain in which the literature of the future has always been held by the here and now.

It’s just so easy to wave a hand and close the door on the science fiction ghetto. 

Sometimes I think that the ‘real’ writers are so afraid of how they’ll be shown up by us genre folks that they’d rather just not compete at all and fondly imagine that keeping the gates locked will keep the cooties away. But I have news for them. it’s in HERE that the future lives. The fences and the locks and the keys…keepg THEM out, not US in. We’re already out there among the stars. Have the literati considered the possibility that it is around THEM, rather than us, that the locked gates and the iron bars really are…?

While I am better known for my fantasy than my science fiction (I sometimes combine the two), I believe that if anything, the sheer vision required to create ANY future from scratch should be a feature of literature, not the bug.

Here are two links to relevant articles well worth you time.

Why science fiction authors can’t win HERE

Building a Better Definition of Science Fiction HERE

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Andrew Hilleman offers

10 Great Westerns You’ve Never Read

My husband, who cut his teeth on westerns, has read a couple of these and urged this link on me. He is still haunted by ‘The Ox-Bow Incident‘, an exploration of mob rule that still echoes harshly for us even today.

Read all of Hilleman’s picks at the PW website HERE

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Surprise! Children’s Books Figured Out Life Long Ago

Children's Book wisdom poster
There’s a reason certain children’s books stay with you long after you’ve left elementary school, Crafty House tells us. “Deceptively simple, such evergreen stories absolutely brim with meaning and insight, serving to remind the reader of the most basic but vital lessons in life.”

 
See all the quotes at Crafty House HERE

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Quote of the Day

Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” ~ Albert Einstein

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Unlikeable? Really?

Blogger Jamie offers her:

“Top Ten Books For Readers Who Like Not-So-Easy-To-Like Characters”

I see a lot of discussion in book reviews and online about unlikeable characters…so often they are talking about a character that I LOVED. I love my characters genuinely flawed and especially in YA I see so much of my high school self in them. Slut-shamer? Bitchy? Maker of horrendous decisions at times? Selfish? Standoffish? HARD TO LIKE? YEPPP. That was me….

Falling into PlaceFalling Into Place by Amy Zhang:

This was a novel FULL of unlikeable characters basically. Like SO HARD TO HANDLE SOMETIMES.

But the way the layers peeled off throughout the course of the book…WOW. I bawled.

Read the whole story HERE

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A New ‘Wrinkle in Time’

A Wrinkle in TimeMadeleine L’Engle with granddaughters Charlotte, left, and Léna, circa 1976. Photo: Crosswicks, Ltd.

Madeleine L’Engle’s ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ has sold 14 million copies since its publication in 1962. Now, a never-before-seen passage cut from an early draft is shedding surprising light on the author’s political philosophy.

Read the whole story HERE

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A hard truth

Authors earn less than the minimum wage

More than 200 years after Samuel Johnson asserted that “no man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money”, a survey of UK’s authors has found that many make nothing at all from their writing, Alison Flood reports in The Guardian.
keyboardPhotograph: Kacper Pempel/Reuters

Philip Pullman, president of the Society of Authors, condemned the findings as a disgrace. “In the past ten years, while publishers’ earnings have remained steady, the incomes of those on whom they entirely depend have diminished, on average, by 29%…While Amazon makes earnings of indescribable magnitude by selling our books for a fraction of their value, and then pays as little tax as it possibly can, the authors whose work subsidises this gargantuan barbarity are facing threats to their livelihood from several directions…

Read the whole story HERE

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Huxley vs Orwell in Graphic Form by Stuart McMillen

We may be a little on this one,” Juxtapoz Art and Culture magazine says, “but we saw this graphic novel/comic strip today that compares the future predictions of Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ to George Orwell’s ‘1984.’ It is pretty damn clever if  you ask us.”

Indeed – and CHILLING.
Huxley vs OrwellSee the whole graphic HERE

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Creative Courage for Young Hearts

15 picture books celebrating the great artists, writers, and scientists are selected by Maria Popova at Brain Pickings, including:

Jane Goodall, Julia Child, Pablo Neruda, Marie Curie, e.e. Cummings, Albert Einstein, Ella Fitzgerald, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Frida Kahlo, and more.

Pablo NerudaNobel laureate Pablo Neruda was not only one of the greatest poets in human history, but also a man of extraordinary insight into the human experience and the creative impulse — take, for instance, his remarkable reflection on what a childhood encounter taught him about why we make art, quite possibly the most beautiful metaphor for the creative impulse ever committed to paper.

His story and spirit spring alive in Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People (public library) by writer Monica Brown, with absolutely stunning illustrations and hand-lettering by artist Julie Paschkis.

See all the books HERE

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Helen Keller listens to music
Helen Keller 'listens' to radio
In March of 1924 Helen Keller, blind and deaf, wrote the following letter to the New York Symphony Orchestra describing how she listened to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony over the radio.

“I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony ….someone suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations…What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibration, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music! …The great chorus throbbed against my fingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth – an ocean of heavenly vibration – and (ended) in a delicate shower of sweet notes…there I sat, feeling with my hand the magnificent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.”

Read the whole letter HERE

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THIS ‘n THAT
Vanishing ActIMAGE: Family photographs of Barbara Newhall Follett. Via Farksolia.

The fascinating story of a writer who stormed the literary world with a novel written when she was 12 and several years later vanished forever.

Read the whole story HERE

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Quote of the day
QUOTE Helen Keller~~~~~
Alma Alexander      My books      Email me   

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