A dragon takes to the air

Nearly a century after the Hindenburg exploded in flames, ending the dirigible era, one company may have finally figured out how to build one suitable for the 21st century. Their “Aeroscraft” will be more than 400 feet long and capable of lifting 66 tons or more.

A video on the website shows a prototype called “Dragon.”

dragon

A proprietary squee, here. I’ve a new Worldweavers novel coming up in 2014 that features an airship named…”Dragon.

The new Worldweavers book is the grand finale, the culmination of the series, a novel called “Dawn of Magic”. It has Nikola Tesla in it again… and this time, Nikola Tesla has to come up with a way ot getting to a place where you CANNOT get to by using any kind of magic because (think magnetic poles) the magic already AT that place serves to actively repel any OTHER kind of magic). So Tesla builds an airship, an airship he calls “The Grey Dragon”.

Tesla and I, we knew something was up.

The Aluminum Airship of the Future

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Time Travel Is Possible But Only To The Future, Physicist Says

First there was the Dragon, a ‘real world’ airship which invokes Tesla’s airship in my book, Dawn of Magic.

Now we have a story about time travel that also echoes the book. In my story, a professor takes a trip into the future, but discovers that getting back … well, you will just have to wait and read the book.

Perhaps the Universe likes the Worldweavers series finale.

One-way trip to the future

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31 Day Blog Challenge, #23
DREAM JOB

I am living it. I am a writer

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The Word Made Flesh

ursula-tatoo

This quote is from Ursula K. LeGuin’s Wizard of Earthsea. It reads “only in silence the word, only in dark the light, only in dying life: bright the hawk’s flight, on the empty sky.”

Tattooed quotes

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A Boy Named Humiliation

I may need to print this out and keep it as an inspiration for naming characters.

Some Wacky, Cruel, and Bizarre Puritan Names

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Suing your way to freedom

Mum Betts was born a slave circa 1742, spending her young adult years in the household of John Ashley in Massachusetts. When Ashley’s wife attacked her, Betts appealed to a local abolitionist, who brought her case to the courts.

Betts was granted her freedom and 30 shillings in damages in 1781, with the case Brom and Betts v. Ashley. She became a paid servant and raised a family on her wages.

Out of slavery

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–Alma Alexander

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