Must Reads for Men !

Flavorwire asked a number of “Feminist Writers” to recommend books “Every man should read.”

My opinion wasn’t solicited. Perhaps it’s just that I’m not considered the card-carrying feminist that my husband says I am. But I’m in favor of the exercise, which came about because a men’s publication made a list of “80 Books Every Man Should Read” that had only one female writer on it.

Do I believe that girls are just as entitled to adventures as boys? Hell, yeah. We don’t want to stay at home and stare longingly at the blue and distant mountains and yearn. Is that feminism? Is writing stories about that carrying a card? If it is, then I have one. I’m one of those girls who set out for the mountains – how could it be otherwise?

Personally, if I had been asked, I’d have recommended the same book that Sonia Saraiya, Salon’s TV critic did — ‘The Left Hand of Darkness’ by Ursula K. LeGuin.

It so effortlessly dismantles gender norms that it’s kind of shocking the world is still standing,” Sonia says.

Right on, I say.

Instead of getting mad about that men’s magazine list, Elisabeth Donnelly writes, “We here at Flavorwire wanted to counter that vibe by asking our favorite feminist writers what they think “every man should read.” The results were funny, smart, and a true reflection of the complex lives that we all lead. Expand your mind, and find your next favorite book, below.

For example:

Ashley C. Ford, who writes essays, interviews, and profiles recommends ‘An Untamed State’ by Roxane Gay:
An Untamed State

There is a line in this book, “It is often women who pay the price for what men want.”

Gay writes brilliantly to this point, revealing how even the good guys are accustomed to getting their way by any means necessary, and how often women are the “means”. Read this to understand what you may never know otherwise: women can be marked by men’s desires, but we can not be defined by it.

 

 

Read the article

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Read whatever the hell you want!

Should adults be reading books supposedly aimed at children and teenagers? Elizabeth Minkel asks in The New Stateman. According to the literary establishment, she says, this is a question fraught with difficulty. “But is it really as hard as all that?” she asks.

Of course it isn’t. Why are we still even talking about it?

Young adult is a marketing term, no more. I write both “Young Adult” and adult books and I think you would be hard-presssed to tell me how they are different. I don’t write down to young adults, don’t use simpler language, or present a simpler world.
Worldwavers ReaderMy Young Adults are for ‘Readers’, period.

Elizabeth Minkel discusses all this in a very thoughtful article which concludes:

So here’s a directive, to anyone who feels like the type of book – or any individual book – is being unfairly attacked: please stop making a case for what you like by putting down what other people like. Stop imagining that the conversation you hear is the only conversation being had. And if you feel like your beloved book is under attack, hit the attacker back with as much positivity as you can manage.

I’ll stand by Harry Potter not because it can be read by a child, but because it can be read by children and adults alike, how it’s a bazillion pages full of little spaces or big ideas to explore, how I fell in love first with the characters on the page, then with the sprawling conversation they inspired. I won’t put you down if you don’t enjoy them – I’ll just invite you to join in.

Read the article

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10 Science Fiction Authors Whose Books Just Kept Getting Stranger

A lot of authors tend to become more conventional over time. At io9, Charlie Jane Anders gives us 10 science fiction and fantasy authors whose books only got weirder.

e.g.
J.G. BallardJ.G. Ballard was a key part of the New Wave of experimental, literary science fiction of the 1960s and 1970s — but he kept pushing the envelope throughout his career. His late novels, starting with Cocaine Nights, examine the relationship between violence and consumerism, and conclude that the former is an inevitable consequence of the latter.

Read the article

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THIS ‘n THAT

16 brilliant paintings that will shake your faith in humanity
Red carpetSee all the paintings

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10 great women street artists
street artLady Aiko is a Tokyo-born, New York-based artist who incorporates elements of Pop Art, abstraction, graffiti and traditional Japanese imagery into her playful depictions.

See them all

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22 Literary Halloween Costumes For Duos
June-AnaisAnaïs & June, Henry and June
June: Long blonde hair, sexy dress — Anaïs: Shortdark hair, sexy dress, stack of notebooks, Mae West eyebrows

Halloween literary costumes

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Quote of the Day

If you enjoy reading something, read it.” ~ S. E. Hinton in The New Yorker on the YA debate

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Alma Alexander
My books

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Riddle me this!

Literature’s most fiendish head-scratchers

For all of you out there with time on your hands and no codes to crack, The Guardian offers a selection of riddles from literature. Get pondering…

e.g. #6:
“Why is a raven like a writing-desk?’” – the Mad Hatter to Alice in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Solve the riddles

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Kerouac’s On The Road turned into Google driving directions

Jack-Kerouac-On-The-Road

 

Gregor Weichbrodt, a German college student, took all of the geographic stops mentioned in On the Road, plugged them into Google Maps, and ended up with a 45-page manual of driving directions, divided into chapters paralleling those of Kerouac’s original book. You can read the manual — On the Road for 17,527 Miles– as a free ebook.

Go On the Road

 

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“My List of Writing Mistakes”

Best way of learning: do, and fail. Next time you’ll do better. Howard Andrew Jones keeps a list of mistakes he made already so that he won’t repeat them. This strikes me as wise.

e.g.
When you’re stuck moving the plot
           Introduce character with info
           Send in the ninjas

Read the article

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THIS ‘n THAT

10 Insane Buildings
HelixVincent Callebaut Architectures
Coming in 2016, Taipei’s double-helix-shaped Agora Garden Tower will split the difference between man and Mother Nature. The twisty, 20-story luxury residential building will be green in every sense of the word, with balconies on each floor to support gardens, and state-of-the-art sustainable features including solar cells and rainwater recycling.

10 Insane Buildings

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The Color of…
Burnt brandyBurning brandy. The color, flame-of-burnt-brandy, was described in 1821 by one ladies’ magazine as a mixture of “lavender grey, pale yellow, and dark lilac.”

Other equally evocative names dating from the same period include dragon’s blood (a deep purplish-red), d’oreille d’ours (a rich brown, literally “bear’s ears”), elephant’s breath (steel grey) and flamme de Vesuve (“the flame of Vesuvius,” or the color of lava).”

19 Colors You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

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Poetry can help students learn in ways that prose can’t.

Why teaching poetry is so important

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10 of the oldest surviving books in the world
etruscan-gold-bookThe Etruscan Gold Book is estimated to be 2,673 years old.

The oldest books

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Quote of the Day
QUOTE Victor Hugo~~~~~
Alma Alexander
My books

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Which fairytales are best?

Well, my five candidates would be:
Little Mermaid 1Sulamith Wolfing, Hedgehog Studios

1) The Little Mermaid (Hans Christian Andersen) – the ORIGINAL version, thank you – the tragic one, no Caribbean singing lobsters anywhere near it, thank you so much

2) The Nightingale and the Rose (Oscar Wilde) – another tragic one (begin to see a pattern…?) and if this doesn’t make you fall in love with language itself nothing ever will.
Neverwhere3) Neverwhere (Neil Gaiman) why yes, we are doing modern and novel length by the rules of the original list – and this is a magnificent modern fairytale.
Match Girl4) Little Match Girl (Hans Christian Andersen) – oh, okay, another tragic one – this one always made me cry – I think it was the Grandmother that always slays me in the end because of the way I loved my own grandmother and I could FEEL THE LOVE.

5) The Once and Future King (T H White) – just to BREAK the pattern, here’s another (relatively) recent book – and it is SO a fairy tale – and it’s one of the few books which has ever made me laugh out loud.
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At The Guardian, Marina Warner discusses her top 10

When I first began working on fairytales,” she writes, “they weren’t really considered a proper subject of study, and I felt inhibited about my enjoyment of them: was I betraying my feminist loyalties? Was I letting down the cause of high art and serious literature?

But fairytales had grown up in the 70s: Anne Sexton’s savage poems and Angela Carter’s celebrated revisionings took them out of the nursery. Since then, they have been growing ever darker and more disturbing, especially as the Grimm brothers’ violent, deadpan ways of telling now dominate definitions of the genre. Parents are rightly puzzled as to whether they should be reading them to their children, though children relish the gore and vengeance.

The most lingering and powerful tales don’t always have an original written text, but shapeshift through time, bobbing about on the streams of story. I’ve tried to choose 10 of the most inspiring, and include some of the great collectors; but as in any exercise of this kind, there are so many that I have had to leave out.

Read the article

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Why we need fairytales

Oscar Wilde’s magical stories for children have often been dismissed as lesser works, Jeanette Winterson writes at The Guardian, but as examples of how important imagination is to us all – young and old alike – they are a delight.
selfish giant oscar wildeLove transfigured by imagination … ‘The Selfish Giant by Oscar Wilde. Illustration: Grahame Baker-Smith

Reason and logic are tools for understanding the world. We need a means of understanding ourselves, too. That is what imagination allows. When a child reads of a Nightingale who bleeds her song into a rose for love’s sake, or of a Selfish Giant who puts a wall round life, or of a Fisherman who wants to be rid of his Soul, or of a statue who feels the suffering of the world more keenly than the Mathematics Master who scoffs at his pupils for dreaming about Angels, the child knows at once both the mystery and truth of such stories. We have all at some point in our lives been the overlooked idiot who finds a way to kill the dragon, win the treasure, marry the princess.

As explanations of the world, fairy stories tell us what science and philosophy cannot and need not. There are different ways of knowing.

Read the article

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The top 10 stories of mothers and daughters

From the Book of Ruth to Pride and Prejudice, here is Meike Ziervogel’s pick of literary mother-daughter relationships

I write to understand myself better. Each story is an exploration, a journey, a search for something I cannot express in any other way. Mother-daughter relationships have been my preoccupation over the past 20 years. Here are some of the books that have inspired me.
Anne SextonPoet Anne Sexton – Photograph: Virago

Searching for Mercy Street: My Journey Back to My Mother, Anne Sexton by Linda Gray Sexton

Anne Sexton wrote brilliant poetry. But she was also bipolar and incapable of fulfilling her role as mother. Linda Gray Sexton’s intelligent, harrowing account of her childhood made me realise that women artists and writers who descend into a dark space for their art have a duty towards their children to climb back into the light on a daily basis.

Read the article

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Chin Up: 5 Utopian Sci-Fi Books Perfect for Adaptation

One of the most recent bizarre trends in contemporary cinema, Lisa Rosman writes in Word & Film, is the rise of the dystopian sci-fi flick. Do we really need a new movie every week to remind us of how dour our future may be? Frankly, it’s high time Hollywood made utopian sci-fi tales, instead. We could use some positive models for a change, and we know just the books that would make great adaptations.

Woman on the Edge of TimeWoman on the Edge of Time: Written in 1976, Marge Piercy’s feminist utopia is astonishingly prescient. It follows a woman subjected to experimental brain surgery, She develops the ability to time travel, and she visits a 2137 in which all people can biologically nurse their children; gender, race, and corporations no longer exist; human reproduction now takes place in labs; and everyone thrives in small, Quaker-like communities. To date, this is one of the most radical sci-fis ever conceived; its rejection of biological determinism (and gendered pronouns!) dovetails nicely with today’s transgender movement.

Read the article

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THIS ‘n THAT

25 Songs That Reference Books

Artist/Song: Led Zeppelin – Ramble On (from 1969’s Led Zeppelin II)
Book: Tolkien’s Lord Of The Rings
Lyric: “‘Twas in the darkest depths of Mordor/I met a girl so fair/But Gollum, and the evil one crept up/And slipped away with her.”

Songs and books
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Words you think you know
Unabashed by these 10 Difficult-to-Remember words

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Quote of the Day

Gossip is charming! History is merely gossip. But scandal is gossip made tedious by morality.” ~ Oscar Wilde

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Alma Alexander
My books

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Is she a Werewolf? or a Wereboy?

Were logoI wanted them real. I wanted the reader to start glancing nervously at the person sitting next to them on the bus or the subway and starting to wonder whether that strange fox-faced sharp-featured woman or the pig-nosed broad-featured guy dozing in the corner actually turned into the things you think they might be turning into, when the moon was right. 

 

It’s been a few years, now, my doing doing this. There’s a trail of interviews scattered on the internet, leading like bread crumbs towards the stories I have put out there.

These interviews have ranged from adequate to sharply insightful and relevant. I don’t rank them, and Il do every interview to the best of my ability, striving to walk the tightrope between being entertaining and informative. But often when an interview consists of pre-chewed questions or asks about stuff I’ve answered many times before it begins to be difficult to keep being fun and original. .

So it’s always a joy to be offered questions that are original, one-of-a-kind, and obviously indicative of the simple fact that the interviewer had actually read the book – and had GOT it!

One of the best such interviews I’ve ever done is up now, at Angela’s Library, where we talk about “Random,” the 1st book in The Were Chronicles, as well as the rest of life, the universe, and everything.  It was a delight to do it.

A brief excerpt:

Q: For most people, the word “Were” will trigger images of werewolves howling at the moon and biting innocent victims. In your novel, though, the Were world extends far beyond wolves and full moons. What was your process for developing the Were-kind in Random?

A: This particular world became very complex very quickly. My version of Werewolves – the Lycans – are definitely not the howling-at-the-moon types. They are scientists and they are driven by that pure scientific fury that can sometimes take over a human soul and demolish it if it stands in its way.

My chagrin here is that I love wolves. If I have a totem animal, it is the wolf. And yet somehow these complex, twisted, driven, fiercely intelligent and loyal creatures that spun out from under my pen just would not be ‘good’, and they quickly evolved into one of the villains of the piece. In Random, they are nebulous, their presence one of that black storm cloud that you might see on the horizon and begin to batten down the hatches in anticipation of hail.

In Wolf, the second book, they take much more of a center stage, and they are absolutely fascinating. Their dynamics, the life of the pack, their loyalties and their mindset, proved to be an utterly enthralling thing to delve into, and while second books in trilogies are too often weak bridges from a great opening in Book 1 to a satisfying conclusion in Book 3, this particular Book 2 is bucking the trend beautifully. It is a strong and beautiful story and it is carried by one of my favorite characters. Jazz’s brother Mal – the wolf of the title – well – I think I fell in love with him, a little bit. I think it will be difficult for my readers not to do the same. He is just such a beautifully strong, vulnerable, wounded, wise, intelligent wolf.

As for the rest of the Were – I actually set out to develop a genetic basis for the “being Were” thing, and that gets worked on in Wolf.

I wanted to breathe  life into the tired old trope you mention, that of the word “Were” calling up the howling murderous mindless beast in the reader’s mind. I wanted Weres to be real. I want the reader to start glancing nervously at the person sitting next to them on the bus or the subway and start to wonder whether that strange fox-faced sharp-featured woman or the pig-nosed broad-featured guy dozing in the corner actually turns into the things you think they might be turning into, when the moon is right.

You will never really know for sure, again, after reading these books, whether someone right there beside you might be something wild and strange during the nights of the full moon… or whether YOU might be.

Read the whole interview and its provocative questions and enter the giveaway of a signed copy of Random. Be the first on your block…

Read the interview

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Quote of the day
QUOTE 'Random', The Were Chronicles~~~~~
Alma Alexander
My books

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Ban it because…!!!

The 12 Weirdest Reasons For Banning Science Fiction and Fantasy Books

People are trying to keep great books out of libraries and schools every hour of every day, Diana Biller and Charlie Jane Anders report in io9. And often, people’s reasons for challenging these titles are really, really… outlandish. Here are 12 SF and fantasy books that people have given incomprehensible reasons for banning.

The Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
Wizardof OzReasons: Too many strong women, negative, theologically impossible.

The Wizard of Oz has a good century of banning under its belt. It was widely banned in 1928 for “depicting women in strong leadership roles.” In 1957 the Detroit Public Library banned the series for supporting “negativism and [bringing] children’s minds to a cowardly level.”

Christian Fundamentalist families were concerned about the book’s theology. Arguing that all witches were evil, the group claimed that the presence of Glinda the Good Witch was a “theological impossibility.” Parents also publically worried that their children would be seduced by “godless supernaturalism.”

Read the article

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“if I could wrap her words around myself like a fuzzy blanket, I totally would.”

A delightful review of Random, the first book in my ‘The Were Chronicles‘, from Angela’s Library, the home of a reviewer and blogger who introduces herself:
“As you’ve probably guessed, my name is Angela, and I’m one of those people who can’t go anywhere without a book in my hand. I’ve been known to read while cooking dinner, brushing my teeth, and even walking across a crowded parking lot…”
Angelas_LibraryI hope you’ll read the whole review but she says in part:

Random isn’t just a story about shapeshifters, it’s a story about humanity. It’s about what it means to be a member of a family, a culture, a race. This is an ambitious undertaking, but Alexander handles it with grace and skill.

…what really made me fall in love with Random is the way Alexander writes. There’s a beauty to her language, an intelligence and insight. Take this line, for example: “I looked at her and I saw an ocean; I looked at myself in the mirror and I saw a suburban fishpond with a couple of tired koi swimming around in circles.” Her voice is comforting and warm, like snuggling up in front of a crackling fire with a mug of hot cocoa; if I could wrap her words around myself like a fuzzy blanket, I totally would.

Something else I appreciated was the humor in the book. Despite the weighty subject matter, there’s plenty of levity to keep you smiling as you read. Much of this humor comes from Jazz’s attitude, particularly towards her parents and brother. She’s funny, passionate, and mischievous in turns, and I found it very easy to like her.

Read the review

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The winner of a signed copy of Random from my week-long stint at The Author Visits is Ewan Macdonald!. Congratulations. The book will be in the mail as soon as copies arrive from the publisher.

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Can You Get Too Old For YA Novels?

The Hunger Games, Divergent, Pretty Little Liars — why do we devour young-adult fiction well past our YA years? John Green, the best-selling author of The Fault in Our Stars, explains in Cosmopolitan:

Suddenly, the vast majority of my readers were grown-ups.

Ever since, I’ve been thinking about why stories about teenagers resonate so much with us as adults. I’ve been a passionate adult reader of YA fiction for a decade, and what I find so compelling about the best YA fiction is its unironic emotional honesty. When you’re a teenager, you’re often doing so many important things for the first time — everything from falling in love to grappling with heartache and loss. You also begin to ask the big questions of humanness: What, if anything, is the meaning to all this? What are my responsibilities to myself and to others?

Read the article

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Forty Portraits in Forty Years
1975, New Canaan, Conn.1975, New Canaan, Conn – Photographs by NICHOLAS NIXON
20142014, Wellfleet, Mass.- Photographs by NICHOLAS NIXON

Nicholas Nixon was visiting his wife’s family when, “on a whim,” he asked her and her three sisters if he could take their picture. It was summer 1975, and a black-and-white photograph of four young women — elbows casually attenuated, in summer shorts and pants, standing pale and luminous against a velvety background of trees and lawn — was the result. A year later, he suggested they might do it every year. “They seemed O.K. with it,” he said; thus began a project that has spanned almost his whole career. The series, which has been shown around the world over the past four decades and a book “The Brown Sisters: Forty Years” will be published in November.

Read the article

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Novelists Who Were Featured on International Banknotes

While American currency features former U.S. Presidents, Founding Fathers, and iconic landmarks, Rudie Obias writes at Mental Floss, many other countries put famous writers, poets, artists, and novelists on their banknotes.
James Joyce IrelandJames Joyce // Ireland: The Central Bank of Ireland issued £10 banknotes featuring Ulysses writer James Joyce in 1993. The back of the note features Joyce’s signature and a line from his final novel, Finnegans Wake, which read, “Riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.”

Read the article

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THIS ‘n THAT

What if you never got into sci-fi in the first place? Where would you start? Hilary Armstrong asks, and offers…

A reading list for newbies

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Homelife.com.offers suggestions on how to create a mini library in your home, no matter how limited your space.

Read the article

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Can you identify the movie from the book’s cover?

Take the quiz

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Quote of the Day
QUOTE Vonnegut~~~~~
Alma Alexander
My books

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“The writing is stellar”

Meet Alma AlexanderWhat a week it was.
Random, The Were ChroniclesThe Author Visits web site gave me the gamut of everything possible for telling everyone about Random, the first book in my The Were Chronicles.

There was a  review (a GREAT one!), there was an exceprt from the opening of Random and a sneak peek at the second book in the series, Wolf. I did a guest blog giving you an insight into the background of these books, and had a fun interview. And 76 of you signed up for the giveaway as I write this.

Thanks to the Author Visits site – and stay tuned – more goodies on “Random” are coming soon on the Internet near you.

About that review: I hope you’ll go to the site and read it all, but here’s an excerpt.

Random is a complex emotional journey of a young girl looking to make sense of a sense-less event that impacts her life and that of her family’s. As she learns the truth behind her sister’s death, she reconciles with Celia’s demise but also finds ways to memorialize her sister by finding purpose and perhaps even conclusion. That is until a double whammy completely changes the course of the story that will undoubtedly be the center of book two.

The quality of the writing is stellar. Well composed and thoughtful, Alexander chooses to give Jazz a mature voice that I appreciated as an adult reader. What I mean by mature has to do with tonality. There is an interesting cast of characters to complement Jazz and Mal’s story and adds dimension to Jazz’s search for answers. The book has no compromising situations or unsavory language.

My rating: a must read. 4 stars. ~  Veena Kashyap

Read the whole review

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Quote of the Day
QUOTE Calamity Jane~~~~~
Alma Alexander
My books

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Science in fiction?

It might have been thought that my entire advanced formal education, my university career, had been wasted because I hold an MSc in Molecular Biology but worked in an actual research lab for only a handful of years before segueing sideways into scientific writing/editing and then into fiction. Well, it took a while but it’s finally happened – my life has caught up with itself.
At long last that science that’s been buried in my past has risen to the surface and is now playing a vital part in my latest series of novels.I undertake the ambitious task (with in-built poetic license…) to posit a genetic and physiological background for Were creatures, folk who exist both in human and animal forms. How they live, what makes them undergo the change, what the effects are on them. All that.
It’s been… quite a trip, so far.
But it seems that real science in fictional worlds is becoming quite a thing – because other writers are doing it, too.
Take Laline Paull who explains in io9 just how scientific facts sent her novel The Bees into an unexpected direction.
Read the article
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Last chance to win a signed copy of Random, the first book in The Were Chronicles.
Enter giveaway here
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Wildlife numbers plunge by 50% since 1970
Habitat destruction and hunting causing huge decline in wildlife population on land, in rivers and in the oceans, a new ‘Living Planet’ analysis from WWF and the Zoological Society of London reveals.
Common dolphin (Dephinus delphis)The short-beaked common dolphin in Ionian Sea, Greece. This dolphin has been in decline in the Mediterranean Sea since the 1960s. Between 1996 and 2007 numbers declined in the Ionian sea from 150 to 15 individuals. Overfishing in the area is thought to have reduced the amount of available prey. Photo: Chris & Monique Fallows /NPL/WWF
ElephantsRapid deforestation in west and central Africa by loggers has left forest elephants with just 6% of their historic range, with 60% population decline from 2002-11, primarily due to rampant poaching for ivory. Photo: Carlos Drews/WWF-Canon
 
Read the article
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Appreciating what’s still here.
Finalists Of The 2014 Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Competition of London’s Natural History Museum and BBC has just recently announced its 50 finalists, chosen from over 41,000 entries. Here are some of the most breathtaking images taken over the last year.
‘Facebook Update’ by Marsel van Oosten
Checking Facebook‘Heavy Rain‘ by Pierluigi Rizzato
'Heavy Rain'See all the finalists
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Writing life stages
As Wolf Lahti pointed out, Moliere said that there are three stages of writing: “Writing is like prostitution. First you do it for the love of it, then you do it for a few friends, and finally, you do it for the money.
My list is a bit different. At Storytellers Unplugged, I offer: The Five Stages of the Writing Life — and those stages are much like the stages of grief.
e.g. #3. Bargaining….and that’s when you start to bargain with the Universe. “If I write THIS kind of thing instead of THAT one, will you let me through?”… “If I write faster/slower/longer/shorter will you let me through?”… “If I do THIS instead of THAT maybe my life will change and it’s my name that everyone will know, it’s my stories that will get referenced in all the articles on the Internet rather than J K Rowling, or Neil Gaiman or Haruki Murakami or…?”
Read the article
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Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Series, In One Handy Chart
Terry PratchettFiguring out just where to start Terry Pratchett’s sprawling, character-dense Discworld series can be a little daunting, Ria Misra writes at io9. So she offers a chart that lets you figure out just how to follow your favorite storylines and characters as they move from book to book.
Read the article~~~~~
THIS ‘n THAT
Emily Dickinson tightsPrinted Tights feature the poem Hope by Emily Dickinson.

Read the article

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This month’s podcast’s focus is on YA fantasy. We talk about how it’s defined, explore good examples, explore a wide range of issues around YA fantasy. Our guests include Alma Alexander, and Randee Dawn.”

Listen to the podcast

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Brazilian Bookstore designed for readers
Bookstore for readersA store for readers where one can take a book and read a chapter even before purchasing it, where one can simply rest and people watch, a place filled with  inviting and pleasant spaces that end up promoting a type of socialization among people, these are the bookstores of the XXI century. © Fernando Guerra I FG+SG

Read the article

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Quote of the Day

“Ideas are simply starting points…What I capture in spite of myself interests me more than my own ideas.” ~ Picasso

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Alma Alexander
My books

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A short story? Hell no!

Meet Alma AlexanderRandom, The Were ChroniclesI’ll be at “The Author visits” all week, the first stop on a blog tour for Random, the first book in The Were Chronicles, my new YA series. There will be a book giveaway, an excerpt from Random, a review, a guest blog post from me, hints about What’s Next.

In my guest blog yesterday, I discussed how The Were Chronicles came about. An excerpt:

The Were Chronicles were born as a short story about a Random Were, a were-creature that followed all the rules of the classic trope, except one. They weren’t nailed into an animal form. In fact, whatever the last warm-blooded creature was that they laid eyes on at the point of their turn… it was THAT creature which they turned into. Anything. A monkey. A rat. A parrot. A seal. Things could get out of control very quickly.

I started out with a comical premise…Right until the moment I realized two things.

One was that I was hitting five thousand words and I hadn’t properly said HELLO yet. This world was bigger, much bigger, than I had anticipated.

The other thing was that I was no longer laughing. This would be a story with a few comic touches here and there… but it was darker than I had thought. And richer. And deeper. And it wanted to tackle painful ideas.

So it wanted to be a novel. I shrugged and reformulated in my head…But it was worse than I thought. It did not want to be one novel. It wanted to be three. And each of the three would be riding the same main story arc but from a different (a VERY different) point of view, re-informing the story anew every time. It was a deeply complex set-up, far more ambitious than anything I had ever attempted before.
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Today, there is an excerpt from Random the first book which is coming out this month.

Read my guest post and the excerpt here

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Quote of the day
QUOTE Reviews~~~~~
Alma Alexander
My books

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Meet the Author

Meet Alma AlexanderRandom, The Were ChroniclesI’ll be at “The Author visits” all week, the first stop on a blog tour for Random, the first book in The Were Chronicles, my new YA series. There will be a book giveaway, an exceprt from Random, a review, a guest blog post from me, hints about What’s Next.

From today’s interview:

Which character in a book would you enjoy having drinks and dinner with?

I’d love to share a rowdy dinner party with the entire royal family of Amber (if I could sit next to Corwin), or perhaps I could visit the Wales of Llewellyn’s era, as portrayed by Sharon Penman, and share Llewellyn’s table (one assumes these invitations mean one can speak a shared language, although my current knowledge of 13th century Welsh is pretty much nil…), or maybe I could have tea with Merlyn from “The Once and Future King”…?

The whole interview here

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10 Best Historical Novels

My novel, The Secrets of Jin-Shei, takes place in an Imperial China that never existed. In fact, I called my version of ‘China’ by another name and in an endnote discussed the differences between my world and historical Imperial China.

That didn’t stop my publisher from trying to position it as a historical novel, some
reviewers from discussing it as such, and some bookstores putting it in the history section.

This comes to mind now because of a story in Publishers Weekly by Alix Christie, author of Gutenberg’s Apprentice, in which she picks 10 of her favorite historical novels. One on her list is the novel, Memoirs of a Geisha, a book that Jin-shei and its sequel, Ember of Heaven, have been compared to.

Memoirs of a GeishaMemoirs of a Geisha by Arthur GoldenMuch has been made of how a male writer could so convincingly inhabit the character of a Japanese geisha. But the novel’s real strength lies in the lucidity and modesty of its storytelling, a lack of fussiness that mirrors spare Japanese aesthetics. Golden’s achievement is to open up a sealed and foreign world in the form of an affecting coming of age tale.

“The historical novels I admire,” Christie writes, “inhabit their worlds so fully that as a reader I feel I’m breathing the air of that distant place or time. This has less to do with historical detail than with a freshness of language, tone and incident that makes the concerns of the characters so recognizably human that they feel almost contemporary. The ability to transport us into different minds is a hallmark of good literature generally; the bar is set even higher when a story’s setting is truly foreign.”

Read the article

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Buzzfeed asks:
Debut novelsFor example:

VonnegutDickens
Try your hand at all 81 titles

 

 

 

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Top 10 health and safety fails in children’s books

From The Hunger Games to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, children’s books can demonstrate a somewhat lax approach to disaster and death. Ross Montgomery, author of The Tornado Chasers, shares his favorite books for danger lovers.

The Tiger Who Came to Tea

 

The Tiger Who Came to Tea by Judith Kerr: Look, if you open the front door and there’s a tiger outside, the first rule is that you don’t invite them in. Don’t come to me acting all surprised when he’s eaten all the sandwiches and drunk all the tea in the teapot.

 

 

Read the article

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THIS ‘n THAT

Oxford Dictionaries Book Quiz of Last Lines

Though a book’s opening lines may determine whether or not you take the book home at all, it’s as likely to be the last lines that stick in your memory long after you set the book down: they may tidily tie up events, or make you question instantly if there is a sequel, or see you muttering “Thank goodness that’s over!”

Take the quiz

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An Anti-Feminist Walks Into a Bar: John Scalzi brilliant’s Play in Five Acts
ScalziRead his blog

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee has been challenged for the past seven decades, the same amount of time it’s been in publication.

22 Mind-Boggling Facts About Banned Books In America

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Terry Pratchett’s Fury

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Quote of the Day

Daphne du Maurier
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Alma Alexander
My books

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What are you hiding?

We moved into a peculiar house. The downstairs area, a “daylight basement”, was  completely unfinished — concrete floors, no ceiling, open to the dirt at the back of the house. So we set about making it livable.One of the areas of the unfinished area was quickly dubbed “The Cave” – a vast concrete bunker behind an odd-shaped hole two feet off the floor. It would have to be dealt with creatively and in a bespoke manner.

Since we were going to have to do something novel anyway, I came up with the idea of having a sliding door which doubled as bookshelves.

When closed, the James Bond door that completely closed off the weird opening looked just like a recessed bookcase. It wasn’t a thing of polished architectural beauty, but it was durable, and serviceable, and amazing.

‘The Cave” was eventually turned into another room and the door is now nearly always open. But when it is closed, it hides a secret treasure — the hidden room is now our library.
library door with catMy cat guards secret room

I love my house.
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14 Other Hidden Rooms

Architecture & Design offers us a look at other secret rooms hidden behind bookcases, fireplaces, or a decorative piece of wall.
Hidden RoomA beautiful arched entry with a secret bookcase door

Read the article

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7 Reasons Why Real Life Romances Are Nothing Like Disney Movies

Many girls dream of their Prince Charming, Missy Yost writes in Lifehack. “Unfortunately, he only exists in Disney movies and books. If you’re not careful, once grown you can fall victim of the fantasy character and sabotage a great relationship and your own happiness by chasing an imaginary prince.”
DisneyImage via Flickr by Loren Javler

If Prince Eric cannot love Ariel when she is a mermaid, then he is not worth the time or effort. Happy relationships are not built on lust and perfection.

Read the article

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The Color Thesaurus

Ingrid Sundberg writes on her blog that “having a variety of color names at my fingertips helps me to create specificity in my writing. I can paint a more evocative image in my reader’s mind if I describe a character’s hair as the color of rust or carrot-squash, rather than red.”

So she created this color thesaurus. Here is a snippet.
ColorRead her blog

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THIS ‘n THAT

30 People who saw a statue as an opportunity, and took it.
Choking statueSee the others

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A forest of 150-foot tall ‘trees’ collect rainwater and generate solar power in Singapore.
'Trees'Read the article

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Mental Floss gives us: Little-Known Punctuation Marks
PunctuationSee the whole chart

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Quote of the Day Banning Books Quote~~~~~
Alma Alexander
My books

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